Monthly Archives: August 2010

  • Sweeping chimneys from the bottom up 'gives better control of dust'

    Homeowners may be able to better clean their chimneys by sweeping from the bottom up.

    Speaking to the Times Argus, certified master chimney sweep Bob Fish explains that he sweeps 90 per cent of chimneys from the bottom up in order to increase control of the dust and avoid working on roofs.

    He notes that chimney sweeping equipment has changed over the years, with brushes being replaced by motorised products.

    "I can actually do a better job today - and I'm safer," Mr Fish comments.

    Homeowners considering cleaning their chimneys might want to make sure they do so before the winter.

    Freshome recommends discarding old ashes, letting fresh air move freely through the chimney by opening the damper and ensuring the flue is operating in the right away.

    It also suggests hiring a professional chimney sweep if necessary to make sure the fireplace is clean and in full working order in time for the winter months.
     

  • Sweeping chimneys from the bottom up 'gives better control of dust'

    Homeowners may be able to better clean their chimneys by sweeping from the bottom up.

    Speaking to the Times Argus, certified master chimney sweep Bob Fish explains that he sweeps 90 per cent of chimneys from the bottom up in order to increase control of the dust and avoid working on roofs.

    He notes that chimney sweeping equipment has changed over the years, with brushes being replaced by motorised products.

    "I can actually do a better job today - and I'm safer," Mr Fish comments.

    Homeowners considering cleaning their chimneys might want to make sure they do so before the winter.

    Freshome recommends discarding old ashes, letting fresh air move freely through the chimney by opening the damper and ensuring the flue is operating in the right away.

    It also suggests hiring a professional chimney sweep if necessary to make sure the fireplace is clean and in full working order in time for the winter months.
     

  • There are 'many ways' to clean a chimney

    Those with properties that include a fireplace may find that there are several ways in which the chimney can be cleaned, according to one site.

    Best Home Renovation Tips Online notes that the most popular method of cleaning a chimney is by using a rod and working from the top down.

    Homeowners can also work from the bottom up, but this can be messy so furniture should be covered up.

    Another method involves two people using a brush with a pull ring and rope attached to each end. One person works from the roof and drops the brush down the chimney, while the other takes the bottom end and pull and push the brush to clean the dirt off the chimney walls.

    "You should use the mirror and flashlight to inspect the inside of chimney and make sure you got every inch of it," the website recommends.

    Certified master chimney sweep Bob Fish recently told the Times Argus that he cleans most chimneys from the bottom up to better control the dirt and dust involved in this task.
     

  • Rectify flue liner problems 'before the cold weather sets in'

    Homeowners looking to improve the condition of their chimney before the cold weather begins should look at any issues with their flue.

    This is according to S E Jones of Helium, who notes that summer can be an ideal time to look over the chimney, especially the flue.

    "If it's letting cold air come in when it's closed, you really need to either clean it, fix it or get a new one in there before it gets cold again," the expert suggests.

    Mel Kahn, owner of Early Times Chimney Sweeps, recently told the GateHouse News Service that homeowners should look out for any build-up of creosote, which is a by-product of the combustion process that occurs in fireplaces.

    Accumulating creosote can result in the inside of the chimney being more prone to catch on fire due to a single spark.

    Getting a certified chimney sweep to inspect the chimney every year can help to reduce the risk of such fires occurring in the home.
     

  • Wood-burning stoves 'can heat an entire house'

    Efficient wood-burning stoves can heat an entire house, those considering investing in one may be interested to hear.

    Pique News Magazine reports that one housing development in the US features wood-burning stoves as part of a wider design plan based on reduced energy consumption.

    The properties boast passive solar construction techniques along with high-end building materials and creative design features.

    Bob Deeks, president of RDC Fine Homes, which is building the houses, told the news provider that he determined that airtight wood-burning stoves are extremely efficient and only require a small amount of wood to heat the entire property.

    He added that burning wood produces the same amount of carbon dioxide as a dead tree left in a forest.

    According to the Press and Journal, modern wood-burning stoves produce a lot of heat while being clean, efficient and controllable at the same time, making them the perfect alternative to real open fires.
     

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