Monthly Archives: July 2011

  • British Gas hit with Ofgem fine

    British Gas has been fined £2.5 million by Ofgem after the company was found to have not dealt with customer complaints efficiently.

    Ofgem discovered that British Gas had breached regulations related to the ways that energy companies react to customer complaints, which may arise from appliances such as flue liners for gas fires.

    It was found that the gas specialist failed to re-open complaints when the consumer had claimed they were not resolved. Also, the investigation saw that British Gas failed to provide customers with key details pertaining to the Energy Ombudsman's redress service.

    Sarah Harrison, Ofgem's senior partner for sustainable development, said: "Today's finding highlights basic failures in British Gas' customer service, particularly in dealing with some of its small business customers."

    Ms Harrison also warned that Ofgem's plans to reform the retail market with a stern approach to enforcement.

  • British Gas hit with Ofgem fine

    British Gas has been fined £2.5 million by Ofgem after the company was found to have not dealt with customer complaints efficiently.

    Ofgem discovered that British Gas had breached regulations related to the ways that energy companies react to customer complaints, which may arise from appliances such as flue liners for gas fires.

    It was found that the gas specialist failed to re-open complaints when the consumer had claimed they were not resolved. Also, the investigation saw that British Gas failed to provide customers with key details pertaining to the Energy Ombudsman's redress service.

    Sarah Harrison, Ofgem's senior partner for sustainable development, said: "Today's finding highlights basic failures in British Gas' customer service, particularly in dealing with some of its small business customers."

    Ms Harrison also warned that Ofgem's plans to reform the retail market with a stern approach to enforcement.

  • Forestry Commission unveils new carbon capture plan

    The Forestry Commission has unveiled a new Woodland Carbon Code, which is anticipated to attract substantial investment in British tree planting projects and combat emissions from flue accessories.

    This new code offers investors a consistent national groundwork about how the planted trees will boost carbon capture, while informing them about the financial options that are available to them.

    Pam Warhurst, Forestry Commission chair, said: "Tree planting projects are attractive to organisations on a number of levels: they can reduce their carbon footprint at low cost, improve the environment, and enhance their environmental reputation."

    In order for companies to adhere to the group's code, woodland projects must be sustainably managed to national standards and use pre-arranged methods for forecasting the amounts of carbon that will be captured by their systems.

    Ms Warnhurst also explained that the required funding opportunities are now available to attract new woods and forests in the UK.

  • JT Hawkes fits out solar plant

    Electrical services contractor JT Hawkes has provided renewable energy among the flue accessories of 1,500 Oxfordshire homes by fitting out a solar power plant.

    The company was pressed against time to design, install and commission Westmill Solar Farm's electricity plant in Swindon in a time frame of six weeks. Its work meant that the farm could go live prior to August 1st, reports the Birmingham Post.

    JT Hawkes managing director John Hawkes told the newspaper: "Our engineers rose to the challenge of using the latest technology to complete Britain's largest solar power plant - and worked round the clock to get it finished in such a short period of time."

    Mr Hawkes also mentioned that he was delighted to be involved in the scheme.

    Recently, Eco Environments claimed that installing solar panels is now perceived as the thing to do, as the public is becoming increasingly aware of the benefits provided by the systems.

  • Work to start on St Dennis incinerator

    It is expected that work on a Cornwall waste incinerator and its associated flue accessories could begin within days, after the council's cabinet elected to spend money on its construction.

    Cornwall Council's cabinet has voted to spend up to £4 million to assist with launching the project, after unanimously deciding to begin work on land acquisition and a St Dennis access road, reports BBC Cornwall.

    Pat Blanchard, from the anti-incinerator action group STIG, told the news provider: "We've sought to raise awareness of waste issues throughout the county and get ordinary people to voice their fears and concerns.

    "From that point of view I can't say our campaign has failed."

    In June, the energy-from-waste plant was granted planning approval after local government secretary Eric Pickles consented waste firm Sita's appeal.

    Earlier this month, a Perth councillor told the Courier that proposals for a £100 million incinerator in the town could have an adverse effect on its economy.

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