Monthly Archives: March 2012

  • Conservatories can 'improve properties'

    The addition of a conservatory can help to significantly improve properties, one specialist has underlined.

    The structures can help to boost the value of homes for people who are looking to sell, while offering a number of benefits for people who want to increase the size of their home, according to a spokesperson from the National Home Improvement Council (NHIC).

    Andrew Leech, director at the NHIC, said: "If they are planned and executed properly they can be either an integral part of the home or they can become a piece which you can shut off so you don't lose any energy efficiencies through the doors and windows."

    Mr Leech recommended that it is much more economical for people to extend their current homes than search for a new property.

    People may also wish to make other improvements to their house, with Ideal Home Improvement ambassador George Clarke claiming that more Britons are conducting DIY work in the current economic climate.

  • Barton accommodation launched with energy efficiency upgrades

    The City West Housing Trust has developed an energy-efficient apartment block in Barton.

    The former 1960s tower block has been transformed into Engle's House, an accommodation which has been fitted with sustainability measures to reduce fuel poverty and global warming, reports GreenBuildingPress.co.uk.

    Colette McKune, director of asset management for the Trust, told the news provider: "We are delighted to be welcoming residents home to their newly modernised apartments which provide some of the most cutting edge technology to keep their homes safe, secure and warm at a much lower cost."

    Ms McKune noted that Engle's House is the first of 12 tower blocks to be constructed, with a new ventilation system installed on the premises amongst other upgrades.

    Her remarks come after 24 Dash reported that the City West Housing Trust had secured government funding to fit new renewable heating systems.

    The funding is provided as part of the Department of Energy and Climate Change's £4 million Renewable Heat Incentive Premium Payment scheme.

  • Barton accommodation launched with energy efficiency upgrades

    The City West Housing Trust has developed an energy-efficient apartment block in Barton.

    The former 1960s tower block has been transformed into Engle's House, an accommodation which has been fitted with sustainability measures to reduce fuel poverty and global warming, reports GreenBuildingPress.co.uk.

    Colette McKune, director of asset management for the Trust, told the news provider: "We are delighted to be welcoming residents home to their newly modernised apartments which provide some of the most cutting edge technology to keep their homes safe, secure and warm at a much lower cost."

    Ms McKune noted that Engle's House is the first of 12 tower blocks to be constructed, with a new ventilation system installed on the premises amongst other upgrades.

    Her remarks come after 24 Dash reported that the City West Housing Trust had secured government funding to fit new renewable heating systems.

    The funding is provided as part of the Department of Energy and Climate Change's £4 million Renewable Heat Incentive Premium Payment scheme.

  • Charity manager collects heat hero award

    A charity manager who has helped elderly people across Worcestershire remain warm in their homes without harbouring concerns about their fuel bills has collected a national award.

    Rachel Jones was presented with the honour from National Energy Action at the House of Commons, after being nominated by Act on Energy representative David Jullien, reports the Worcester News.

    Act on Energy chief executive David Jullien told the newspaper: "Rachel has worked incredibly hard over the past seven years devising ways to help elderly people who are really struggling to keep warm."

    Mr Jullien emphasised that, due to the high cost of fuel, many people are wary of using their heating as they believe they may not be able to afford their bills.

    Recent research by the Money Advice Trust found that its National Debtline has seen a significant increase in the number of people it helps who are suffering from fuel debt.

    A total of 13.7 per cent of calls to the phone line now concern the issue, a rise from 2004's figure of 2.7 per cent.

  • Pay-as-you-go oil scheme introduced in Northern Ireland

    The first ever pay-as-you-go oil scheme has been introduced in Northern Ireland.

    It has been developed by local firms Kingspan Environmental and Carillion Energy Services and will be fitted on 20 oil tanks across homes in the Dungannon, Carnlough and Newcastle region for three months.

    Jillian Ferris, client and stakeholder director at Carillion Energy Services, said: "Carillion decided to team up with Kingspan Environmental to find a pay as you go method that works for people in fuel poverty as well as for those householders who want more control over their energy usage."

    Ms Ferris explained that the selected homes have been chosen because they include a range of different people, which will help to ensure that the system meets the requirements of all householders.

    Professor John Hills, from the London School of Economics and Political Science, recently predicted that the number of people in fuel poverty will jump from 2.7 million to 2.9 million by 2016.

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