Chimney Cowls

  • Excess heat may be used in Sheffield for homes and businesses

    Excess heat from steel plants could be utilised to heat Sheffield and decrease the city's carbon emissions.

    This is according to specialists at Sheffield University's engineering faculty, who believe that the numerous steel plants situated just outside the city centre could be attached to an existing heating network.

    Professor Vida Sharifi, who led the research, suggested that the technology could be used in other British cities.

    "The government has estimated that if district heating were used across the UK in areas with high heat demand, it could supply around 5.5 million properties and contribute a fifth of the UK’s heating needs."

    Sheffield University's research comes after a spokesperson from Sustain Worldwide advised that firms can boost the energy efficiency of their properties by making use of sustainably sourced materials.

    Gordon Miller, co-founder and sustainability and communications director of Sustain Worldwide,  added that 25 per cent of heat loss occurs through the roofs of under-insulated buildings.
     

  • E.ON to freeze energy prices

    E.ON has announced that it will not be increasing its gas and electricity prices this year.

    The company's decision comes after it revealed that it made less than two per cent profit from supplying gas and electricity to UK homes in 2011.

    Dr Tony Cocker, chief executive of E.ON UK, said: "E.ON will not raise residential prices in 2012. I want every family in the UK to know that we will always do our best to be fair and act in the best interests of our customers."

    Mr Cocker continued by saying that he hopes the move will demonstrate that it is committed to helping its customers, while illustrating to potential future subscribers that it is a firm which prioritises consumers.

    News of E.ON's decision follows a study by Gocompare.com, which found that electricity bills are the hardest to understand for consumers.

    Thirty-six per cent of people find the expenses challenging to comprehend.

  • East Durham Homes improves 3,000th household

    East Durham Homes has reached a new milestone in its improvement project, with the firm recently completing work on its 3,000th household.

    In partnership with FHM, Kier and Wates, the company finished decent homes work on 1,256 properties in 2011/2012, meaning that its percentage of such residencies has reached 39 per cent.

    This compares favourably to 2009, when there was only ten per cent decency.

    Mr and Mrs McGann from Seaton Crescent commended the company for its work, with Mrs McGann saying: "The work that's been done is absolutely fabulous and I’m very pleased with the end result."

    FHM contracts manager Barry Meters also commented on the work, noting that it is wonderful to see the difference that the improvements make to people's lives.

    Last month, Energyhelpline introduced the Huge Switch purchasing scheme, which hopes to enable consumers to lower their energy bills.

    The initiative allows people to see the best available market prices when they sign up, so households can instantly swap to cheaper packages.
     

  • Historic Carlisle chimney given new health check

    Steeplejacks have given a historic Carlisle chimney its annual health check.

    The Dixon's Chimney was built over 175 years ago and the local authority appoints specialist workers every year in order to climb to the top of the 270ft structure, reports the News and Star.

    "It is intended to check the safety of the structure by looking at any loose bricks or stones that may become dislodged, checking for cracks or movement," a council representative explained.

    In order to complete the maintenance, ladders are fitted to anchor points all the way to the top of the chimney, before a chair is used to spin around it and enable a detailed inspection.

    Last month, the North West Evening Mail reported that chimney stacks are to be repaired in Barrow as part of a new project to upgrade homes.

    Roughly £1.7 million will be invested to install new roofs, repair chimney stacks and fit insulation in areas where it is necessary.

  • Historic Carlisle chimney given new health check

    Steeplejacks have given a historic Carlisle chimney its annual health check.

    The Dixon's Chimney was built over 175 years ago and the local authority appoints specialist workers every year in order to climb to the top of the 270ft structure, reports the News and Star.

    "It is intended to check the safety of the structure by looking at any loose bricks or stones that may become dislodged, checking for cracks or movement," a council representative explained.

    In order to complete the maintenance, ladders are fitted to anchor points all the way to the top of the chimney, before a chair is used to spin around it and enable a detailed inspection.

    Last month, the North West Evening Mail reported that chimney stacks are to be repaired in Barrow as part of a new project to upgrade homes.

    Roughly £1.7 million will be invested to install new roofs, repair chimney stacks and fit insulation in areas where it is necessary.

Items 16 to 20 of 161 total

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6
  7. ...
  8. 33