Wood Stove Pipe

  • Wood furniture is becoming a household favourite

    Wooden furniture is one of the current trends in interiors, and property owners should consider what colour will match up to their wood burning fireplace.

    Adrienne Chinn, design director at Adrienne Chinn Design, said that burnt or aged wood finishes are very popular at the moment, while bleached wood, matte finishes and sustainable teak are being chosen.

    It is also possible to buy wood which has been painted to fit into a room's existing style, with turquoise, orange and lime green helping to add a splash of colour to people's property.

    "Good quality wood is always a popular option as it is good looking, is natural – be sure that the wood is from a sustainable source - and with a bit of care, can stay looking good for centuries. It brings a bit of nature into the home and softens the harder edges of modern living," she added.

    Wood could be a great choice as a fireplace surround. With a marble hearth, a dark timber frame would sit well in a room with cream walls and a minimalistic style.

  • Wood furniture is becoming a household favourite

    Wooden furniture is one of the current trends in interiors, and property owners should consider what colour will match up to their wood burning fireplace.

    Adrienne Chinn, design director at Adrienne Chinn Design, said that burnt or aged wood finishes are very popular at the moment, while bleached wood, matte finishes and sustainable teak are being chosen.

    It is also possible to buy wood which has been painted to fit into a room's existing style, with turquoise, orange and lime green helping to add a splash of colour to people's property.

    "Good quality wood is always a popular option as it is good looking, is natural – be sure that the wood is from a sustainable source - and with a bit of care, can stay looking good for centuries. It brings a bit of nature into the home and softens the harder edges of modern living," she added.

    Wood could be a great choice as a fireplace surround. With a marble hearth, a dark timber frame would sit well in a room with cream walls and a minimalistic style.

  • Choosing between gas, coal and wood fires

    Fireplaces can often be the standout feature in a room, and much of this will depend on the type of fuel that it burns.

    Traditional wood fires have the potential for looking the best and will add a certain amount of tradition to a property.

    They can come in the shape of a full-on fire or a special wood-burner, and homeowners will be able to enhance their room by creating some wood storage or buying a special basket for keeping timber dry.

    However, wooden fires are not as hot as coal ones and this could be a consideration for a property which is hard to heat.

    Coal is a little bit messier than wood, although the bricks will give off more heat, despite the lack of spectacular flames.

    With a gas fireplace, users have greater control over its use and heat output, while they also have the advantage of being quick and easy to turn on and off with no preparation or other material needed.

  • Brits becoming more comfortable with colourful interior design

    A woodburning stove will often take pride of place in a front room, and more frequently these items are being supported by colourful interior design.

    Lawrence Llewelyn-Bowen, interior designer and TV presenter, said that homeowners are becoming more comfortable with splashes of colour in their property.

    He noted that this wasn't paler shades like lilac or blush, but bolder schemes such as red, which would have been a big no-no five or six years ago.

    "We're falling in love with our living rooms again, rather than a price tag or something we can just make money out of. We know that, actually, the principal investment in our homes is the emotional investment, not the financial investment," Mr Llewelyn-Bowen stated.

    The use of colour around the fireplace could help to offset a rustic-looking burner and bring it into the modern age.

    Furthermore, additional warmth will be added to the room by using shades such as red, rather than creams.

  • DIYers need to stick to comfort zones, says expert

    It is important for DIYers to stick to their comfort zones when undertaking any home improvement projects.

    Anna-Marie DeSouza, editor of Build It + Home Improvement magazine, encouraged people to have a go at doing things that they feel comfortable with.

    "If you're quite a skilled DIYer, have a go at hanging that door. If you're not, maybe start off with something small and build up your repertoire that way, or try to get advice from somebody who is maybe a seasoned DIYer or get some lessons from the local college or DIY store," she advised.

    Ms DeSouza went on to note that the old stereotype of men dominating the DIY arena is "massively old hat now".

    According to the expert, a recent statistic showed that 45 per cent of women like doing their own home improvement tasks, as opposed to 50 per cent of men.

    This was backed up by a study from Unibond and No More Nails, which revealed that both sexes spend 33 hours each year undertaking DIY tasks.

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